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Short Papers

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The Emergency Department waiting room: towards a Speculative Service Design framework

AUTHORS:

Troy McGee

Daphne Flynn

Selby Coxon

Rowan Page

 

ABSTRACT:

This paper describes an experimental, methodological approach to design research that draws upon the methods of speculative design and service design to present the framework of Speculative Service Design (SSD). This framework aims to aid service designers to explore and interrogate the tensions within future service experiences. Its goal is to draw on speculative tools and techniques to present them as a way to explore, extrapolate and evaluate future service experiences. SSD aims to imagine hypothetical service futures before they happen, decoupling design from direct market imperatives and illuminating the capacity that we, as citizens, have to influence its development and deployment. This paper then presents how this framework has been applied in practice to the Emergency Department waiting room within a practice-based PhD. This example investigates the role of technology in future waiting experiences in the Emergency Department, and is used as a vehicle to proactively reflect on service experience futures before they happen. In doing so, the framework provides designers with a method to unpack the ideologies and philosophies that drive the development and deployment of technology.

 

KEYWORDS: Emergency Department Waiting Room, Speculative Service Design, Speculative Design, Service Design

 

BIOGS:

Troy McGee

I am an equal parts designer, researcher and maker. I design health futures, services and experiences. Currently, I am a PhD candidate in Design at Monash University, within an interdisciplinary research lab - Design Health Collab - that is concerned with the future of health and wellbeing. My research is deeply collaborative and crosses disciplines of design, creative practice, healthcare, and emergency medicine. I am motivated by solving complex challenges and working alongside passionate individuals.

Daphne Flynn

Daphne is Director of Design Health Collab, Monash Art, Design and Architecture’s Health and Wellbeing lab. Daphne works to encourage collaboration with university researchers, industry partners and medical bodies. As a Practice Professor, Daphne draws on a broad range of experiences with various design consultancies, as well as a variety of business from small firms to multinational companies. Daphne’s interest is in applying design thinking methodology to facilitate innovation, particularly in the area of healthcare and wellbeing. Whether the challenge is considering the ergonomics and ease of use of medtech devices or creating better patient experiences in healthcare organisations, design can play a central role in facilitating innovation and change. Daphne’s experience includes collaborations with MIME in medtech research, designing the award-winning asthma prediction device X-halo, and investigating a Hospital-to-Home healthcare pilot program for Philips.

Selby Coxon

Dr. Selby Coxon is the Director of the Mobility Design Lab hosted by the Department of Design at MADA. He holds a PhD, Masters and Bachelor's degree in Industrial Design. His professional career spans over thirty years working for both the corporate sector; Philips Electronics and Schlumberger and private consultancy; IDC and Anglo Nordic Design in Europe, Scandinavia and Australia. His research interests, especially in his current role, concern improvements and far reaching ambitious interventions in the design of mobility, particularly public transport. Research projects undertaken have been for a diverse group of organisations; Metro Trains Melbourne, Yarra Trams, Volgren, Transdev, General Motors and SNCF (the French National Railway). 

Rowan Page

Rowan Page is a lecturer in Industrial Design at MADA and a researcher in the Design Health Collab, an interdisciplinary research lab at the intersection of design and health. His PhD research explored how design research and practice can facilitate greater engagement with the recipients of medical devices, during the formative stages of research and development. Working in collaboration with Cochlear Ltd, this research led to the production of several medical devices and a speculative project exploring the future of cochlear implant systems. Rowan now works on several medical device development projects and has an interest in how design research, practice, and prototypes can aid in medical translational research. His research interests include co-design, speculative design, digital fabrication, emerging technologies and the function of designed artefacts as boundary objects within collaborative and interdisciplinary design projects. Through his teaching in the third year industrial design program Rowan is involved in several work integrated learning projects. These projects connect students with industry through real-world design projects with partners such as MONA, CSIRO, Orora, ABC, and Monash Health.

The non-participatory patient

AUTHORS:
Juan Sanin

ABSTRACT:
This paper discusses tensions and paradoxes of codesign paradigms and calls for more plural approaches to participation in order to establish collaborations with non-participatory users. It builds on research experiences in the field of design for wellbeing to challenge assumptions about user participation and introduce the concept of ‘the non-participatory patient’. This conceptual figure is used to represent those users who do not engage with codesign activities, or those who engage, but contribute in ways that contradict expectations of designers and industry partners. It is argued that most service design projects are not able to account for the needs and preferences of non-participatory users, who are most of the time excluded from design processes and outcomes for being considered as disengaged or disobedient. These experiences make evident the need for collaborative tools, techniques and formats beyond those traditionally used in codesign, and able to bring more plurality into service design. 

 

KEYWORDS: codesign, non-participatory patients, design for wellbeing

 

BIOGS:
 

Juan Sanin

Juan Sanin is lecturer in the School of Design at RMIT University. His design practice is situated in the field of co-design, and is focused on the creation and implementation of probes that facilitate the participation of non-designers in design processes. Another aspect of his practice combines design research and cultural studies to examine the role of material culture in the configuration of the everyday life, in particular, the role of things in the mediation of a wide variety of everyday experiences such as the sense of home, national identity, wellbeing, or ‘the analogue’.

Conceptual Design Framework for Digital Technology Assisted Service System

AUTHORS:
Kentaro Watanabe
Yusuke Kishita
Tsunetomo Kaito


ABSTRACT:
Digitalization is a strong enabler to increase the productivity of existing services and develop innovative services. Meanwhile, the ethical and societal concerns about the negative impact of digital technologies are also growing. In addition to the principles and guidelines for development and use of digital technologies, there is a need for a design methodology to integrate them in services in a harmonized manner. In this study, we suggest a conceptual design framework for digital technology assisted service systems (DSS). This framework is based on several theoretical foundations including service system design, scenario design, value sensitive design and institutional theory. Our framework illustrates DSS with four layers (value, actor, digital and institution) and its transition in order to clarify required design elements for socially conscious development and integration of digital technologies. 

 

KEYWORDS: digitalization, service system design, social and ethical concern

 

BIOGS:
 

Kentaro Watanabe

Kentaro Watanabe, Ph. D is a senior researcher at Human Augmentation Research Center, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) in Japan. His research domains are service engineering, design, and innovation. He is specifically interested in technology integration and digitalization in service systems. He received his Bachelor and Master of Engineering from the University of Tokyo, and Doctor of Engineering from Tokyo Metropolitan University. He has several years’ experience of product and business development in private companies. He was a visiting researcher at VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland Ltd (2016-2017). He serves as a board member of Society for Serviceology (an academic society of service research in Japan) since 2018. He is also engaged in standardization activities from the service design perspective in ISO/TC 159 (ergonomics) and TC 324 (sharing economy).

Yusuke Kishita

Yusuke Kishita, Ph. D has been working as Lecturer at the University of Tokyo since 2016. His research interests include scenario design for sustainable futures, backcasting, roadmapping, and circular economy. He is involved in several research projects regarding, e.g., sustainable consumption and production (SCP), service system design, and mobility system. Prior to taking the current position, he worked at Osaka University as Postdoc and Assistant Professor (2011-2014) and National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) as Research Scientist in 2015. He served as Guest Researcher at Technische Universität Braunschweig (August-November 2019) and Visiting Academic Fellow at University of Cambridge (December 2019-February 2020). He holds MSc and Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from Osaka University. He has been appointed as one of The University of Tokyo Excellent Young Researchers in 2017.

Tsunetomo Kaito

Kaito Tsunetomo is a graduate student at the University of Tokyo. He is majoring in Precision Engineering. His research interests include service system design, participatory design, and design engineering. He has been engaged in a service system design research project as a technical trainee at National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) since 2019. He got his bachelor's degree in Precision Engineering from the University of Tokyo.