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Long Papers

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Day 2: Wednesday 3rd Feb 2021

PDF of abstracts and author biographies available soon


Organisation and the complexity of service design

  • Designing an organisation’s design culture: How appropriation of service design tools and methods cultivates sustainable design capabilities in SMEs (#2)

       Cathrine Seidelin (IT-University of Copenhagen, Denmark)

       Stine Moeslund Sivertsen (Industriens Uddannelser, Denmark)
       Yvonne Dittrich (IT University of Copenhagen, Denmark)

  • ‘Not Invented Here’: Continuous alignment as key to achieving implementation in service organizations (#8)

       Joannes Barend Klitsie (Delft University of Technology, Netherlands)
       Rebecca Anne Price (Delft University of Technology, Netherlands)

       Sicco C. Santema (Delft University of Technology, Netherlands)

  • Proliferating Service Design in a large multi-cultural IT organization – an inside-out approach (#24)

       Ravi Mahamuni (TCS, India)
       Sylvan Lobo (Tata Consultancy Services, India)

       Bhaskarjyoti Das (Tata Consultancy Services, India)

  • Patterns of disruption: diagnosing response mechanisms in actor networks (#15)

       Vanessa Rodrigues (Linköping University, Sweden)
       Stefan Holmlid (Linköping University, Sweden)
       Johan Blomkvist (Linköping University, Sweden)

Joannes Barend Klitsie

J.B. Klitsie is a PhD candidate at the Delft University of Technology at the Faculty of Industrial Design Engineering (Department of Design, Organisation and Strategy). Barend studies how the infrastructure of service organisations can be (re)designed to realize design driven organisational transformation. His research topics include g implementation, organisation- and service design, the Valley of Death, transformation through design and design innovation. In his PhD research, Barend is practice-driven and uses an Action Research methodology.

Rebecca Anne Price

Dr. Rebecca Anne Price is an Assistant Professor of Transition Design at the Faculty of Industrial Design Engineering at Delft University of Technology, Netherlands. Educated and practiced as an industrial designer, Rebecca was quickly drawn to the strategic potential of design as source of resilience. Rebecca completed a PhD in design-led innovation at Queensland University of Technology in Brisbane, Australia. Now at TU Delft, Dr. Price works with public and private organisations to support the application of design upon complex innovation challenges. While the predominant domain of her work to date has been mobility (aviation, automotive, urban transport), her methodological research in particular holds increasing value to domains related to public health and energy transitions that stem from a socio-technical perspective of the possibilities of design.

Sicco C. Santema

Prof. dr. Sicco C. Santema is Professor of Networked Innovation at the Faculty of Industrial Design Engineering at Delft University of Technology. Sicco studies the role of design in bridging the barriers for the implementation of innovations in networks, at organisational, departmental/team and individual level. His research covers Organisation Science, New Institutional Economics and Design, including the effect of digitalisation. He is head of the People in Transit research group.

Patterns of disruption: Diagnosing response mechanisms in actor networks

AUTHORS:

Vanessa Rodrigues

Stefan Holmlid

Johan Blomkvist

 

ABSTRACT:

Service and failures associated with it occur in networked contexts. It is important to understand patterns of disruptions in service, and how actors influence possible failures through their participation as it will impact value creation. This paper reports the results of an interview study analysed using critical incident theory supported by design-driven generative tools. We identify eight patterns of disruption: request, query, hiccup, delay, mistake, flaw, breakdown and the unexpected. The paper also contributes a disruption ripple model, and identifies five tensions in responding to disruptions: competing priorities, dealing with difficult others, mismatching expectations, shouldering responsibility and reluctant assistance. The patterns of disruption provide a more nuanced way of understanding incidents in service situations. The ripple model and identified tensions illustrate the underlying complexities in network relationships. We argue that service providing organisations need to address the development of relationships to support beneficial value outcomes.

 

KEYWORDS: service design, disruption ripple model, service failure, critical incident technique, healthcare

 

BIOGS:

Vanessa Rodrigues

Vanessa Rodrigues is a doctoral student in design at Linköping University, Sweden and a former Marie Sklodowska – Curie research fellow within the Service Design for Innovation Network. Her PhD research focuses on fostering a more nuanced understanding of resilience in service systems that better accounts for how to enable much needed service system resilience through service design. Other areas of research interest include the future of service design as well as designing for service systems, social impact services, nomadic welfare, healthcare and policy. She holds a M.Sc. in International Business from Maastricht University, The Netherlands and has prior work experience in hospitality and consulting

Stefan Holmlid

My research focus on what happens to design when it meets new theoretical or practice areas, and seeks to integrate with these, such as the practices of service design, design for policy, and design for service.

Johan Blomkvist

The main focus of my PhD project is service prototyping. I approach the topic by interviewing practicing service designers and by looking at the result of prototyping activities in service design projects. The research aims at defining and conceptualising service prototyping and understanding the constraints and possibilities associated with prototyping for services. On a larger scale I hope to be able to contribute knowledge about new techniques and approaches to prototyping when the object of design is largely intangible and made up of interactions between humans.

Unpacking the nature of social structures as the materials of service design

AUTHORS:

Josina Vink

Kaisa Koskela-Huotari

 

ABSTRACT:

Service design is increasingly broadening its focus from creating intangible offerings to shaping service systems. This shift calls for a re-examination of the materials of service design. The traditional emphasis on touchpoints and service interfaces reflects a reductionist approach that leaves service design practitioners tinkering with disconnected parts, rather than addressing the service system as a whole. While historically social structures, such as norms, rules, roles and beliefs, have been seen as externalities in service design, a focus on shaping service systems brings them into the spotlight. The purpose of this paper is to build a more holistic understanding of service design materials to enable a systemic service design practice. Drawing from institutional theory, this paper develops a conceptual framework of service design materials that situates the traditional materials as the physical enactments of institutionalized social structures. The framework deconstructs the nature of service design materials by suggesting that they are all comprised of regulative, normative, and cultural- cognitive elements and have specific contradictory properties. Building on this understanding, the paper presents a practical tool called the Iceberg Blueprint of Service Systems that can help service design practitioners to expose the social structures constituting service systems.

 

KEYWORDS: design materials, social structures, institutions, systemic approach, service design, service systems

 

BIOGS:

Josina Vink

Josina Vink is an Associate Professor in service design at the Oslo School of Architecture and Design (AHO) and Design Lead within the Center for Connected Care (C3) in Norway. Josina’s research explores how design can create profound and significant change in healthcare by reshaping social structures. She recently finished her PhD on service ecosystem design at the Service Research Center (CTF) in Karlstad University, Sweden as a Fellow of the European Union’s Marie Curie Horizon 2020 program within the Service Design for Innovation Network (SDIN). In addition, she has worked for ten years as a service and system designer in health and care, including at the Mayo Clinic Center for Innovation in the United States and the Center for Addition and Mental Health in Canada. In her practice, she has developed new services, supported policy change, facilitated shifts in practices across sectors, and led social lab processes.

Kaisa Koskela-Huotari

Kaisa Koskela-Huotari is an Assistant Professor in Business Administration at Karlstad Business School and the CTF, Service Research Center of Karlstad University. Kaisa’s research interests lie at the intersection of service-dominant logic, institutional theory, and systems thinking. In her work, she uses these perspectives to inform the understandings of innovation, design and market evolution. Her research is published in the Journal of Business Research, Journal of Service Management, Journal of Services Marketing, Journal of Service Theory and Practice, Journal of Strategic Marketing, and Service Science. Kaisa also serves as the Assistant Editor of the AMS Review, the only marketing journal that focuses exclusively on conceptual articles.

Dignity as a principle of service design: a study of four perspectives on dignity and their applications to pedagogy

AUTHORS:

Miso Kim

 

ABSTRACT:

Dignity is a fundamental principle of today’s democratic society as well as human-centred design. Dignity is particularly important in the design of services. Services directly influence those who go through the service system, and many services seek to change their customers as a core outcome. Additionally, service coproduction often starts with tense situations in which strangers meet for the first time, which can sometimes lead to serious conflict. A humanistic principle, such as dignity, is needed in this process and in the outcome of a service. Designers can better integrate and support dignity by treating it as a principle, method, quality or pedagogy of service design. This paper explores four perspectives on dignity: as a universal right, as interpersonal care, as merit and as autonomy. I introduce the key philosophical interpretations, social backgrounds, and historical shifts in the concept of dignity with design examples. Dignity as a universal and intrinsic value of human nature is likely the dominant meaning of dignity in today’s democratic society. Dignity also concerns a humanistic treatment that is exchanged with another individual based on social emotions. Historically, however, people were seen to have more dignity if they proved to be better suited for a higher rank. In contrast, modern philosophers argued that the basis of dignity is autonomy, that is, the capacity for decision and action. I then present service design projects from a class, in which student teams utilized each of the four perspectives as a guiding principle for redesigning a flight experience.

 

KEYWORDS: service design, dignity, design principle, design pedagogy, flight experience

 

BIOGS:

Miso Kim

Dr. Miso Kim is an assistant professor of Experience Design in the Department of Arts + Design at Northeastern University. She holds a PhD in Design, an MDes in Interaction Design, and an MDes in Communication Planning and Information Design from the School of Design at Carnegie Mellon University. She also holds a BS in Architecture from Sungkyunkwan University in Korea.